In this episode I chat about comparison and why it’s not always possible to just ‘dream, believe and achieve’ like all those IG Fitness Gurus tell you.

We dive into why genetics means you need to work with what you’ve got, and the real and actionable ways you can move yourself along the sliding scale of health.

We also talk about my epic arse, why I’ll never have legs like Naomi Campbell, and why I was miserable living on the everyone’s dream island, Ibiza – so yeah, a pretty mixede bag today! Haha!

If you wanna get to know me better, get some awesome health knowledge bombs, and hang out with business owners like you, committed to sorting out all the health-related shit that’s holding them & their business back, then come & hang out in my Facebook group!

And if you’d like to submit a question to be answered on the podcast, just email hello@food.ninja

Enjoy the episode!

Transcript
Hayley:

Hi, and welcome to the Fit For Business podcast with me Hayley Field, also known as the Food Ninja. I'm here to chat with business owners about their health and how it impacts their business and vice versa. And to share with you all the latest tools, tips and strategies that are working for myself and my clients. Hope you enjoy the episode.

Hayley:

Hello, and welcome to this next episode of the Fit For Business podcast with me Hayley Food Ninja. The more astute of you may have noticed last week that I took a little break, I'm sure you know, with the 10s of listeners I've got a lot of you noticed!

Hayley:

Actually a couple of people did say to me where it was last week's episode. But as you may be able to hear from my voice, I was really sick last week. And I've still got a little bit of some sort of lurgy going on.

Hayley:

So my voice was pretty bad last week, so I had a little break. But obviously I'm back now with this next solo episode.

Hayley:

And today I want to talk about something that I think affects a lot of people. And that is comparison, with the clients that I work with. I do work with mostly business owners.

Hayley:

So we have all of the comparison goes on in the online space about, you know, whether you're crushing it in your business, and whether your launch went as well as someone else's and someone else had a six figure launch and all that kind of stuff.

Hayley:

And then on top of that, we have the comparisons that we make to other people in regards to our health. I see this quite a lot because I have a Facebook group. It's a free Facebook group, by the way, so why aren't you in it, if you're not in it, getting it, I'm gonna put a link to it in the show notes.

Hayley:

But obviously, there are clients in there, there are people who have just sort of come across me online. So you know, I've got clients who've been working with me for one or two years, for example, as compared to someone who might have just found me last week and thought what the fuck she talking about? Let's go have a look at let's have a nose in our Facebook group and see what's going on.

Hayley:s saying, oh, you know, I did:Hayley:

Because, you know, how can you compare where you are. Now if you're right at the beginning of your health journey, as compared to someone who's been having one to one coaching for two years, you're going to be in a very different place.

Hayley:

And as well as being at different stages of your journey, there is a very good scientific reasons, surprise, surprise, we're going to talk about science, why it's actually just bullshit, compare yourself to other people, because we are all so different.

Hayley:

So I want you to stick with me with this episode, because initially, it's going to sound a little bit depressing. I'm not going to lie. But we are going to have an uplifting bit at the end, I promise you so stay with me.

Hayley:

So one of the main reasons is not a good idea to compare yourself to other people is genetics. So in one of the lectures for my qualification, my nutrition qualification, which I did with a guy called Martin MacDonald, he describes this concept really, really well.

Hayley:

So I'm going to borrow from him for a little bit just to try and illustrate to you why, you know, if you're on Instagram, and you've seen all these kind of motivational personal trainers going, you know, just dream, believe achieve. You can be anything you want, you know that they're normally sort of sort of leant against the kitchen counter eating out of a Tupperware with a top off. Yeah, with all the six pack out or whatever. Not everyone can get a six pack.

Hayley:

I'm sorry to destroy your dreams, right? But these Instagram models and people on the cover of Men's Health, normalising you know, it's completely possible for everyone to get a six pack completely possible for everyone to look like Arnold Schwarzenegger, is completely possible.

Hayley:

If you train hard enough, you know, you can be the next Mat Fraser You can win the CrossFit Games.

Hayley:

I always use the example of you know, I love Naomi Campbell. She's got the most amazing legs on the planet, that woman, I really want legs like Naomi Campbell, like it's not going to happen for me. It doesn't matter how much I dream and believe you No, I'm not going to achieve that. And it's down to genetics.

Hayley:

I want to explain to you how this works. So if you imagine a scale, so we've got a scale, it's an imaginary scale. Out of one to 10. So, if you are number one, then you are super healthy. You know, everything is amazing, you've got amazing genetics going up to number 10. So number 10 is, you know, you've got quite a lot of metabolic diseases and you're more at risk of having it, maybe you already have diabetes, you know, heart disease, that kind of thing.

Hayley:

So that is kind of like a scale of health, if you like, now, when we're born, we're all born somewhere on that scale. Okay? Again, it's an imaginary scale, you can't go online and look up. Where was I born on the health scale? Right? We don't know that. But we're born somewhere along that scale. And that is determined by lots of things.

Hayley:

So it's determined by the health of your mum, when she got pregnant, her diet while she was pregnant, how healthy a pregnancy she has. And in fact, there's a really interesting study, he knew there was gonna be a study, right? Obviously, there's a really interesting study that showed that the health and the diet of a pregnant woman not only determines the health of that baby when it's born, but it also determines that child's propensity to become obese in adult life, which is fucking mind blowing by imagine like that responsibility.

Hayley:

Like, you know, all pregnant women know that they should eat healthily. But to be told, you know, your diet is actually going to determine whether your child is more likely to, to become overweight as an adult, that's actually mind blowing, isn't it. But anyway, as I said, lots of factors will determine where you're born on this scale.

Hayley:

Okay. So if you're born at a number one, and you're super healthy, and things like your choices in life may not have much of an impact or so much of an impact on your health. So if you're born at number one, and you decide that you're going to start smoking, and you know, drink heavily, maybe that kind of makes you move up that scale towards poor health, you know, maybe you become a four or five.

Hayley:

So you might move to a four or five, and somebody else might already be a four or five, they might have been born at four or five. And maybe those same choices, move them along to a seven or an eight, which means that they're more likely to get ill, whereas you're not.

Hayley:

Or maybe they decide to diet and exercise and maintain a healthy weight and never drink and never smoke. And maybe they can move themselves down to a two or three, the genetics and where you are on that scale will always determine your starting point.

Hayley:

For example, if I think of the clients that I've had, I've had a client who had a six pack at 15% body fat, which is, you know, I'm talking about a man here, which is fairly unusual.

Hayley:

But I've also had another client who dieted down to about 8% body fat just to get a six pack, I wouldn't normally encourage this, but it was for a very specific reason. He eventually got that six pack at about 8% body fat, but we had to follow some quite extreme protocols, right.

Hayley:

So the diet was very restrictive. There was a lot of time spent in the gym, and let me tell you, he was fucking miserable. So while a six pack might be something that you aspire to, it's having a look at what are the trade offs for that, if you are not naturally or genetically able to get a six pack at a decent kind of body fat?

Hayley:

Do you really want to die it down to 6% body fat, it affects your mental health. It affects your sex life, it affects your hormones, it affects your social life. So I think if we were all a little bit more accepting of where we are on this genetic scale, or this scale of health, we might be a little bit easier on ourselves, right?

Hayley:

If we take another example that I'm seeing on Instagram, a lot so obviously, a lot of people are aspiring to look like Kim Kardashian. I mean, it's a bad example, right? Because she's surgically enhanced. But you know, this big old butt so I'm gonna use myself as an example. I have lordosis in my spine, as well as a lot of other back shit. That's, you know, I'll talk about that another time, you know, bionic back, spinal fusion all that kind of stuff. But I've always had quite a big butt.

Hayley:

And I love squatting. But when I was at school, I was teased about this, you know, duck arse and all sorts of stuff. To the point where, you know, I have memories of actually been stood at the school bus stop and purposefully kind of like, tuck it like tilting my pelvis, you know, trying to squeeze my core muscles and trying to tuck my bum under, right?

Hayley:

Because when I was at school, it wasn't fashionable. It was all like Kate Moss, you know, 90s, heroin chic, like, my big old ass was not fashionable. When I was at school, it's way fashionable now, right?

Hayley:

But I see a lot of like, I feel like there's gonna be a whole generation of girls, who are gonna have really bad lower back pain. Because when you go into Instagram, you see them, literally throwing their backs out to get the best Belfie. Like, it's just ridiculous.

Hayley:

But you know, that's another example of like, if you genetically don't have a big ass, like, I genetically have a big ass, right, I've made it bigger by doing squats, but not because I want to look like Kim Kardashian. But just because I want to be strong, I want a strong ass, which is a really weird thing to say.

Hayley:

Anyway, but you know, I guess that's what I'm saying is just work with where you are, start with what your genetics have given you, and improve on that.

Hayley:

Another great example that I talked about a lot is this FTO gene. So this was discovered a few years ago. And it's basically a gene, that means that people who have this gene expressed, they are more likely to be overweight. So obviously, the media got ahold of this, and they called it the fat gene, you know, all it means is basically there's a higher likelihood of becoming obese.

Hayley:

So all these people then sort of brushed out and said, Oh, my God, I need to get tested for the FTO gene, like, I need to know how I got it. But why, like, why do you need to know whether you have this gene or not? What difference is it going to make to your life? If you discover you have the FTO Gene?

Hayley:

How are you going to behave differently? Are you just going to press a Fuckit button and say, Oh, my god, yeah, there's my genetics, like I'm overweight because of the FTO gene. So I'm just gonna give up, I'm not going to bother exercising, and I'm just going to eat takeaways every night. There's no point in trying to be healthy, because I'm always going to be fat. Because I have the FTO gene.

Hayley:

That's not the case. Because the uplifting bit of this podcast or this episode is, yes, this is your genetics. Yes, you're both born somewhere along that scale. But you can change it, your genetics and not your destiny. Okay. So there is a say in quite a famous saying, which maybe you've heard of that genetics loads the gun, but lifestyle pulls the trigger.

Hayley:ight have to walk a couple of:Hayley:

You know, just because you have this gene, it doesn't mean you're going to be overweight, because you know, I see a lot of people using genetics as an excuse, oh, I can never be healthy. Like it's in my genes. My mum's overweight, my dad's overweight, and a lot of the time that has nothing to do with genetics, that is to do with learned behaviours. If you are, you know, with your family, and you all do the same thing. So if you all eat the same things, if you don't eat particularly well, if you don't do any exercise, that is a learned behaviour.

Hayley:

So you know being overweight is a is a result of your choices. It's not always a result of the genetic so there's is no excuse is what I'm saying. Or in a more hopeful way. Let's just say it's not your destiny, and there is stuff that you can do about it and as well as your genetics and lifestyle factors.

Hayley:

It's also trying to think about your health as a whole because you know if you take ballerinas for example, so I know that maybe a lot of women All girls will look at that sort of figure and think, oh, wow, you know, skinny, good muscle tone elegant.

Hayley:

I would love to look like that. But you know, if you if you believe the rumours, you know, supermodels, ballerinas they kind of live on a diet of cigarettes, cocaine and tissues, right?

Hayley:

Like, that's not healthy, and having to always look a certain way for your job, you know, that's not healthy, either. That's definitely something that I have been susceptible to in the past, I think, you know, I've been through periods since I started this business where I've not been able to look after myself particularly well, you know, during periods of stress, on top of that pressure of trying to look after myself when you know, my head has not been in a good place.

Hayley:

I've also had that extra pressure of Oh, shit, like, I don't look like a nutritionist, I should look a certain way because I in this industry. And that's not to say that I shouldn't be doing those healthy behaviours, because absolutely, I should, because why should I ask my clients to do that? If I don't do that myself? I guess what I'm trying to say is this comparison, this aesthetic comparison, there's a lot more to it.

Hayley:

You know, if you're doing healthy behaviours, and you're feeling good, how you look should be secondary. And I kind of lost I lost track of that, I guess, when I was trying to think that I should look like a nutritionist, whatever the fucking nutrition is, looks like, right?

Hayley:

Anyway, as I was saying, there are also other factors that determine whether you can be healthy or not. So for example, where you live, if you don't have access to good quality, cheap food, if you live in an area with a lot of pollution, if you live somewhere that's really isolated, for example, that can affect how healthy you are, you know, if you live in a place that's isolated, and you don't feel connected to people, you don't go out and socialise, you're not as active.

Hayley:

So, you know, comparing yourself to an Instagram model who has a private chef, you know, or a celebrity and lives, you know, in the countryside and has an Gym, in their house and all that kind of stuff. Those are other considerations you need to make when you're trying to compare yourself to other people.

Hayley:

And there's a place in Japan, that's a really good example of this. So there's an island called Okinawa, where for film fans, Mr. Miyagi from the Karate Kid is from Okinawa, as is Hattori Hanzo, who made Kill Bill swords, I don't think there's I don't know whether that place was chosen for for those people to come from because of it being healthier place.

Hayley:

I can't imagine Quentin Tarantino was thinking about that, but they go anyway.

Hayley:

It's one of the healthiest places to live in the world, measured by the fact that they have more people over 100 in their population than most of the places, it's been studied quite a lot. And yes, they have a healthy diet in Okinawa, and there's a lot of fishing and stuff like that.

Hayley:

But one of the main reasons is they have a very close knit community. And everyone in the community has a sense of purpose, they have a role to fulfil in the community. And they have a lot of religious and spiritual stuff going on as well.

Hayley:

So when you're looking at your health, you need to think about the other facets of your health as well.

Hayley:

And another example I use of this is when I used to live in Ibiza. So when I lived in Ibiza, I know that people would look at my photos on Instagram of you know me on lovely beaches. And, you know, yes, I had access to a lot of sunshine and beaches and lovely places. And, you know, I was incredibly lucky to live there for for a long period of time. I guess I was physically healthier because I had more exposure to vitamin D. I was outside a lot more.

Hayley:

Mentally was I healthier? Absolutely not. I didn't have that sense of purpose. I didn't have that connection. I was very disconnected from the type of people that live there. They weren't really my type of people, I guess, you know, I'm a very sort of logical, scientific, evidence based person and there weren't a lot of those sort of people arrived. I mean, I had sort of two or three really good friends in Ibiza, but I didn't have that sense of connection.

Hayley:

I felt very disconnected from a lot of the type of people that lived there. I missed my family. I missed my friends. I spent a lot of time with people who spoke a different language to me. I mean, I did learn Spanish and I could still speak Spanish really well, but you know, cultural differences.

Hayley:

So yeah, it was weird. It was a weird time even though it appears like it might be A really healthy place to live or not obviously, if you go clubbing all the time, it's it. You know, health is so much more than that,I guess.

Hayley:

So I hope that hasn't been too depressing an episode for you, you know, and I hope that you have taken from this, that wherever you are on that genetic scale, you can do something to improve it, eating really well. sleeping really well. Having healthy coping mechanisms, managing your stress, well, getting exposure to sunlight and daylight and move it around.

Hayley:

And, you know, do an exercise that you enjoy. feeling connected with people and having this sort of sense of purpose is something to get up for in the morning and write if you have all those things, it doesn't really matter where you were born on that sort of health scale, if you like,

Hayley:

it's just bringing a bit of reality, I guess to it in, you know, a world at the moment, which is given us a really skewed idea of reality, you know, turn on the TV, and you see lots of young, tanned, fit people, I don't know, whatever they're doing on love Island, I don't fucking watch it. It's awful.

Hayley:

But you know, for young people nowadays, that is what is reality is like, and Instagram and Photoshopped images and that kind of stuff. So I guess the purpose of the podcast was literally just to bring a bit of reality to that.

Hayley:

But to give you also a bit of hope that actually it doesn't matter where you were born on that scale, you can always do something to make yourself feel better, you can always do something to make yourself feel healthier, there is always something you can do to move along that scale a little bit more.

Hayley:

So that's it for today. I would love to know what you thought of today's rambling episode. And if you have any questions about anything in today's episode, or anything at all, I would love to hear from you.

Hayley:

I love to hear from people who listen to the podcast. You know, there's not a huge amount of you right now, and I'm working on that. But I would love to hear what you think. And I'll be happy to answer any questions. Maybe I'll do that.

Hayley:

Maybe I'll do an episode of sort of q&a. Let me know what you think. Until next time, please take care of yourselves and I will see you next week.

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